A GIS approach to changes in site location and visibility across the Magdalenian and Azilian in Spain

The importance of the visibility of, and from, an archaeological site has mainly been researched in relation to megalithic monuments and fortified settlements. Few studies have tried to unravel the importance of visibility for hunter-gatherer site locations. A new study, published in Journal of Anthropological Archaeology, addresses this issue for the Late Palaeolithic in Cantabrian…

Who let the hyaenas out? Do we mistake hyaena dens for hominin occupation sites?

Since the first discovery of Pleistocene mammal fauna with lithic tools, the role of carnivores as accumulators at archaeological sites, both modern and during the ice-age, has been well established. The analysis and identification of specific types of carnivore bone surface modification and accumulation patterns during the 1960-1980s advanced our knowledge and understanding of site…

Wildcat consumption by Neanderthals at Abric Romani (Spain)

While Neanderthals are generally seen as mainly exploiting large and medium-sized ungulates, more and more evidence indicates that they were processing smaller, faster animals as well. A good example is the recently published study by Gabucio et al. in Quaternary International. They undertook detailed analyses of the remains of wildcat (Felis silvestris) from  level O…

MIS 9 Bone retouchers around the Mediterranean Sea

The use of organic materials as both tools in themselves and as tools for the retouching and preparation of other stone artifacts has been identified throughout the Palaeolithic from early sites like Boxgrove through to more recent Middle Palaeolithic sites (Soressi et al 2013). New work by researchers from Spain and Israel have identified and…